International Journal of History ISSN: 1309 4173 (Online) 1309 4688 (Print)

Yıl:2014 Cilt: 6  Sayı: 3  Alan: Tarih

Sean Foley
Bir Amerikan Rahibi İslamın Gücüne Güvendiğinde: Modern Dünyada Müslüman Tıbbı, Akılcılık ve Kamu Sağlığı
 
This paper discusses how Ottoman science helped Cotton Mather, Boston and the Anglo-Atlantic World accept inoculation in 1721. Mather was more willing to put his faith as a Christian in Islamic medicine than one of America’s founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin, and many other leading secular voices at the time. The process reflected the intersection of two trends in the Anglo-American Atlantic world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: the European Enlightenment and a vision of Islamic civilization that recognized and sought to benefit from its intellectual and social achievements. It also challenges two misconceptions: Islamic science stagnated after the medieval period and Muslims did not contribute to American history before 1800. Finally, this paper reframes Mather’s place in history. Despite his achievements, he is remembered for his unyielding defense of the Salem Witch Trials—one of the worst miscarriages of justice in American history.

Anahtar Kelimeler: Smallpox, Boston, Ottoman Empire, Islamic Science, and Cotton Mather.

Doi Number :10.9737/historyS843

When an American Minister Put His Faith in the Power of Islam: Muslim Medicine, Reason, and Public Health in the Modern World
 
This paper discusses how Ottoman science helped a prominent American Protestant Christian Theologian, Cotton Mather (1663-1728), and the Anglo-Atlantic World accept inoculation—a process that saved lives from Smallpox in Boston in 1721 and led to advances in public health in the West. Ironically, Mather was more willing to put his faith as a Christian in Islamic medicine than one of America’s founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin, and many other leading secular voices. The process reflected the intersection of two trends in the Anglo-American Atlantic world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: the European Enlightenment and a vision of Islamic civilization that recognized and sought to benefit from its intellectual and social achievements. It also challenges two misconceptions about Islamic science and American history: first, Islamic science stagnated after the medieval period and fell behind European medicine after the Renaissance; second, Islam and Muslims did not contribute to American history before the nineteenth century. In addition, this paper reframes Cotton Mather’s place in American history. Despite his intellectual achievements, he is almost universally remembered for his unyielding adherence to Puritan Christian dogma and defense of the Salem Witch Trials (1692)—one of the worst miscarriages of justice in American history.

Keywords: Smallpox, Boston, Ottoman Empire, Islamic Science, and Cotton Mather.

Doi Number :10.9737/historyS843

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